I would like to know how you think libraries play a part in education, both formal and life-long. Thanks Lemony!

Asked by rachelfershleiser

rachelfershleiser:

lemonysnicketlibrary:

The part libraries play in education is the part bubbles play in champagne.  They may seem at first to be merely a shimmery addition, but they are the central feature of the entire enterprise and the reason, joyous and astonishing, to keep imbibing.

image

Lemony Snicket answered my question!

That’s nice. But I can tell you, as the son of a librarian, that librarians prefer their analogies, like their real lives, involve lots and lots of whiskey.

High-res siphotos:

When Tiger Woods arrived for this SI cover photo shoot on March 31, 1998, he walked right up to Samson, a snow tiger, and during 30 minutes of posing with the beast, on cue he looked intense and laughed.  But Woods made it clear that there was one thing he wouldn’t do. Before anyone had even asked, he announced, “I’m not going to growl.” (Heinz Kluetmeier/SI)

Later, Tiger enjoyed a 3-way with Samson and a Burmese Mountain Dog named Skip.

siphotos:

When Tiger Woods arrived for this SI cover photo shoot on March 31, 1998, he walked right up to Samson, a snow tiger, and during 30 minutes of posing with the beast, on cue he looked intense and laughed.  But Woods made it clear that there was one thing he wouldn’t do. Before anyone had even asked, he announced, “I’m not going to growl.” (Heinz Kluetmeier/SI)

Later, Tiger enjoyed a 3-way with Samson and a Burmese Mountain Dog named Skip.

Wal-Mart cutting health benefits for 30K part-timers

breakingnews:

Associated Press: Wal-Mart is falling in line with most of its retailing peers in announcing cutbacks on part-time workers’ eligibility for health insurance. The nation’s largest private employer cited rising costs, saying far more US employees and their families are enrolling in its health care plans than it had expected following the rollout of the Affordable Care Act. 

Al Jazeera’s Fault Lines wins Emmy Award for outstanding investigative journalism

aljazeerapr:

From left to right: Carrie Lozano, Sebastian walker, Warwick Meade, Mat Skene and Singeli Agnew

Doha, October 1st - Fault Lines: “Haiti in a Time of Cholera”, which was a joint production by Al Jazeera English and Al Jazeera has been honoured with an Emmy Award for Outstanding Investigative Journalism in a News Magazine.

“Haiti in a Time of Cholera” was produced by Sebastian Walker, Singeli Agnew, Jeremy Dupin, Carrie Lozano, and Mathieu Skene, and edited by Warwick Meade. The film begins in Haiti, where thousands died after a cholera outbreak. The focus of the film then turns to the United Nations in New York where Walker pursues high-level officials, including Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, to question them over their organisation’s role. “Haiti in a Time of Cholera” was nominated alongside “Made in Bangladesh,” another Fault Lines production produced by Laila Al-Arian. In addition to Al-Arian, the production team behind the film was made up of Anjali Kamat, Tim Grucza, Andy Bowley, Warwick Meade, Paul Sapin, Joel Van Haren, Omar Mullick, Nafeesa Syeed, and Mathieu Skene.

Read More

The collective total compensation of Times Co Chairman and Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr., CEO Mark Thompson and Vice Chairman Michael Golden, including the value of stock awards and incentive payments, was $11.9 million in 2013, according to the company’s annual proxy statement.

From Reuters, earlier this year. Which makes this even more shameful. 

We really want to get rid of these [tanks]. We’ve been trying to get the military to take them back since 2004.

Chelan County Sheriff’s Department’s Undersheriff John Wisemore, as quoted in "Police Want to Get Rid of Their Pentagon-Issued Combat Gear. Here’s Why They Can’t."

In the past eight years, the Pentagon grant program has loaned local law enforcement some 200,000 ammunition magazines, 94,000 machine guns, and thousands of armored vehicles, aircraft, land mine detectors, silencers, and grenade launchers—all at the request of the local agencies themselves. But images of the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, of police in military gear cracking down on peaceful protesters, have turned many communities against a program critics say has eroded the line between police officers and soldiers. […]

Even before police militarization made the news, hundreds of police departments were finding that grenade launchers, military firearms, and armored vehicles aren’t very useful to community policing. When Chelan County police officers requested one armored car in 2000—the request that landed them three tanks—they pictured a vehicle that could withstand bullets, not land mines. Law enforcement agencies across the country have quietly returned more than 6,000 unwanted or unusable items to the Pentagon in the last 10 years, according to Defense Department data provided toMother Jones by a spokeswoman for Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.), who has spearheaded a Senate investigation of the Pentagon program that is arming local police. Thousands more unwanted items have been transferred to other police departments.

But some agencies have found the process of getting rid of unwanted military gear next to impossible. Agencies can’t return or trade equipment without Defense Department approval, and because the Pentagon technically still owns the equipment, they can’t sell it.

According to interviews with state officials running point between the Pentagon and police, the Defense Department prefers to leave equipment in circulation whenever possible. “It’s a low-cost storage method for them,” says Robb Davis, the mayor pro tem of Davis. His town is trying to shake its MRAP. “They’re dumping these vehicles on us and saying, ‘Hey, these are still ours, but you have to maintain them for us.’”

(via hipsterlibertarian)

This is fascinating. 

Also, how much do they want for those tanks, anyway?

Debate Simmers Over Disclosing Warrantless Spying - NYTimes.com

"Obama administration lawyers have been debating whether the Treasury Department must inform the people or groups it sanctions as foreign terrorists when it relies on warrantless surveillance as the basis for the designation, according to officials familiar with the deliberations.

Intelligence officials are said to oppose being more forthcoming about who has been subjected to surveillance, especially in cases involving noncitizens abroad — who do not have Fourth Amendment privacy rights — because such information would tip them off that the National Security Agency had intercepted their communications.
But a provision in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, requires the government to disclose when it uses information from eavesdropping in any “proceeding” against people. In 2008, Congress made the N.S.A.’s warrantless surveillance program a part of FISA, but the full implications of applying its disclosure provision to that program were initially overlooked.”