Showing 15 posts tagged Egypt

Future historians will long puzzle over how I was given an international platform to freely pontificate on the Arab people and be remunerated handsomely for it. It is true that I am not the only person in the world who formulates dubious theories based on scant or no evidence which I then harangue people with. Other people do it. They are called taxi drivers. But they are not as rich as me and haven’t been awarded three Pulitizer Prizes.

In which Tom Friedman finally explains himself. (h/t @TonyKaron)
High-res cheatsheet:

Our West Coast editor Kate Aurthur asks a good question. We’d like to know, too.

The two aren’t exactly connected, you know? This is like asking, “Has there been a smart piece about one of Mike Vick’s dogs that takes into account the dog’s persona as a treat-hungry bitch?”
I think it would be very difficult to do the kind of story you describe without essentially saying “she had it coming.”

cheatsheet:

Our West Coast editor Kate Aurthur asks a good question. We’d like to know, too.

The two aren’t exactly connected, you know? This is like asking, “Has there been a smart piece about one of Mike Vick’s dogs that takes into account the dog’s persona as a treat-hungry bitch?”

I think it would be very difficult to do the kind of story you describe without essentially saying “she had it coming.”

Tumblr’s Egypt hash tag has been a very beneficial resource for many of us during the Egyptian revolution, but I wonder if we need more tags. Maybe Yemen, Algeria or even better a general revolution tag?

newsflick.

To the last suggestion: Absolutely not. These are diverse people with diverse grievances and challenges. We shouldn’t use a metadata tag to curate an experience for people who like “revolution” and want to see it all in one place in their Tumblr dashboard.

-JN

[newsflick

(via the20s)

Seconded on the “revolution” tag. But it’s an interesting point to think about broadening this for other news events.

(via the20s)

It was a society in stagnation, if not decline. Despite ostensible stability, its people — especially its young people — faced a future bleaker than the dark side of Pluto. For decades, the richest grew even richer, as national debt mounted, middle-class people tried to make ends meet, and upward mobility fell. Government failed to address these problems, and the governed felt increasingly disenfranchised — and partisan. Mass unemployment metastasized from a temporary illness to a chronic condition. One of its major cities decided to erect a permanent tent city, for a permanently excluded, marginalized underclass.

This isn’t Tunisia, or Egypt — but America.

Umair Haque, in an interesting HBR article, “Egypt’s Revolution: Coming to an Economy Near You.”  (via joshsternberg)

Journalists in Egypt: CSM reporter and photographer attacked

csmonitor:

A 1st-person report from our reporter and photographer who was threatened and attacked in Cairo today (2/3/2011)

Never, in my three years in Cairo, had I experienced anything like it. But it was nothing compared to what happened when we joined the protests at Tahrir Square.

Violence had broken out suddenly as thugs and Mubarak supporters attacked the peaceful crowd. We ran to cover the action from the side of the pro-democracy, anti-Mubarak crowd. Yet when Ann raised her camera to photograph the men throwing rocks, she was an instant magnet for abuse.

Men hit her camera, pushed her, and roughed her up. “No photos!” they shouted threateningly. We tried to leave them behind, but more like them were everywhere.

When one of them grabbed her and tried to drag her off, we struggled with him and Ann’s shirt was torn. We were under siege; everywhere we turned, people were threatening us. It was clear that other foreign journalists around us, particularly photographers, were also being attacked. Some were also arrested.

It was one thing to keep an eye out for incoming rocks or tear gas canisters, as I had done the previous week when police fought the protesters, with a friendly crowd around me. It was another to try to dodge flying chunks of concrete and angry aggressive men at the same time.

- Kristen Chick, the Monitor’s Cairo correspondent, has been on this story since Jan. 25.

By making inroads to media and adopting the tendencies and sensibilities of journalism, Tumblr could make friends with content providers while, at the same time, distinguishing itself from others in the world of social media. It’s got more wiggle room than 140 characters, and it’s a network that’s defined less by personality and friendships and more by the value of shared information. It has the raw material, at any rate, to shape an alternate news feed.

Nieman Lab’s Justin Ellis, with a nice piece on Tumblr’s Egypt tag page

42 Members of Congress Met With the Egyptian Military Last Year

theatlantic:

Chris Good reports:

Egypt, it turns out, has a respectable presence in Washington.

Since protests swept through Cairo and Alexandria last week, the press has started delving into Egypt’s relationship with the American government. The Egyptian government has spent $1.1 million per year employing some of the top lobbyists in D.C., and those lobbyists have orchestrated numerous meetings on Capitol Hill and with State Department officials.

Thanks to the transparency mavens at the Sunlight Foundation, we know that 42 members of Congress (three senators and 39 representatives) met with Egyptian military officials in 2010 alone. Such meetings are disclosed by the lobbyists who arrange them, and Sunlight has culled the information from available records.

See the complete list here.

Interesting. Though not surprising—that’s what the Egyptian government pays these lobbyists for…