Showing 12 posts tagged Space

High-res colchrishadfield:

Floodwaters pour into the Coral Sea near Rockhampton, Australia on Tuesday morning.

I know in my head that this is just a lesser version of Google Earth. 
But come on. Dude is shooting out his window from space. 

colchrishadfield:

Floodwaters pour into the Coral Sea near Rockhampton, Australia on Tuesday morning.

I know in my head that this is just a lesser version of Google Earth. 

But come on. Dude is shooting out his window from space. 

High-res life:

Happy birthday, Stanley Kubrick.
To celebrate, LIFE.com offers a series of photos from the set of ‘2001’ — pictures that suggest the astonishing lengths to which Kubrick was willing to go to make his vision a reality.
Pictured: Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey.
See more photos here.


These are amazing.

life:

Happy birthday, Stanley Kubrick.

To celebrate, LIFE.com offers a series of photos from the set of ‘2001’ — pictures that suggest the astonishing lengths to which Kubrick was willing to go to make his vision a reality.

Pictured: Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

See more photos here.

These are amazing.

High-res kateoplis:

The seven original Mercury astronauts participate in U.S. Air Force survival school at Stead Air Force Base in Nevada. From left to right: L. Gordon Cooper Jr., M. Scott Carpenter, John H. Glenn Jr., Alan Shepard, Virgil I. Grissom, Walter M. Schirra Jr., and Donald K. Slayton. Portions of their clothing have been fashioned from parachute material, and all have grown beards from their time in the wilderness. The purpose of this training was to prepare astronauts in the event of an emergency or faulty landing in a remote area. (NASA) 
In Focus: The Historic Flight of Mercury 6

Go look at all of these. So, so cool. 

kateoplis:

The seven original Mercury astronauts participate in U.S. Air Force survival school at Stead Air Force Base in Nevada. From left to right: L. Gordon Cooper Jr., M. Scott Carpenter, John H. Glenn Jr., Alan Shepard, Virgil I. Grissom, Walter M. Schirra Jr., and Donald K. Slayton. Portions of their clothing have been fashioned from parachute material, and all have grown beards from their time in the wilderness. The purpose of this training was to prepare astronauts in the event of an emergency or faulty landing in a remote area. (NASA) 

In Focus: The Historic Flight of Mercury 6

Go look at all of these. So, so cool. 

High-res nprfreshair:

thrillhouseisameme:

nprfreshair:

When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed  90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t  quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a  fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an  astonishingly small area.

A little bit shocking if you think about it. When you think about people landing on the moon you would only assume they took a big look around the place. Guess I was wrong..

Uh, remember this from yesterday? Today, NEIL ARMSTRONG wrote back to explain what happened.

Read this; it’s fantastic. My favorite part, from Armstrong:

During my testimony in May I said, “Some question why Americans should return to the Moon.  “After all,” they say “we have already been there.”  I find that mystifying.  It would be as if 16th century monarchs proclaimed that “we need not go to the New World, we have already been there.”  Or as if President Thomas Jefferson announced in 1803 that Americans “need not go west of the Mississippi, the Lewis and Clark Expedition has already been there.”   Americans have visited and examined 6 locations on Luna, varying in size from a suburban lot to a small township.  That leaves more than 14 million square miles yet to explore.

nprfreshair:

thrillhouseisameme:

nprfreshair:

When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed 90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an astonishingly small area.

A little bit shocking if you think about it. When you think about people landing on the moon you would only assume they took a big look around the place. Guess I was wrong..

Uh, remember this from yesterday? Today, NEIL ARMSTRONG wrote back to explain what happened.

Read this; it’s fantastic. My favorite part, from Armstrong:

During my testimony in May I said, “Some question why Americans should return to the Moon.  “After all,” they say “we have already been there.”  I find that mystifying.  It would be as if 16th century monarchs proclaimed that “we need not go to the New World, we have already been there.”  Or as if President Thomas Jefferson announced in 1803 that Americans “need not go west of the Mississippi, the Lewis and Clark Expedition has already been there.”   Americans have visited and examined 6 locations on Luna, varying in size from a suburban lot to a small township.  That leaves more than 14 million square miles yet to explore.

High-res nprfreshair:

When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed  90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t  quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a  fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an  astonishingly small area.

This is so, so disappointing.
Especially since Aldrin clearly should have scored on the corner kick. 

nprfreshair:

When you superimpose a soccer field on top of NASA’s map, it turns out Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin — the entire time they were there — barely crossed 90 yards of moon! What Neil called “a giant leap for mankind” wasn’t quite as giant as it seemed. Oh, the trip was a “leap” to be sure, a fantastic accomplishment, but the first moon explorers explored an astonishingly small area.

This is so, so disappointing.

Especially since Aldrin clearly should have scored on the corner kick. 

Today in Amazing: Spacelog

david:

Spacelog

cameronmoll:

This is fascinating. Original NASA transcripts from early space exploration. The transcript formatting reads like blog comments or a Twitter conversation. Every comment has a permanent URI — here’s the original “Houston, we’ve had a problem.” Additional controls at the bottom of each page reveal the original transcript and a map showing where the crew was during the conversation.

If this isn’t making content meaningful, accessible (in a traditional sense), and enjoyable to consume, I don’t know what is.

This is so, so cool, and such a great interface.